‘America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom’ by Michael Ian Black + Meghan McCain

'America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom' by Michael Ian Black + Meghan McCain

'America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom' by Michael Ian Black + Meghan McCain

I am an unabashed fan of Meghan McCain. I respect that she is a woman in the spotlight – who constantly gets burned – and still sticks to her ideals. Michael Ian Black, well, I had no idea who he was but as he was a coauthor of this book I figured I would soon find out. And I found of a lot of things while reading this book – that Meghan gets carsick, and that Michael (who is a stand-up comedian from VH1 ‘Who Loves the 80s) likes to wear linen pants and crocs.

But really, who cares. What is the point? Why am I reading this 300+ page book? Well, turns out the main goal was to take a Republican (Meghan) and a Democrat (Michael) across the United States in a dirty RV and have them dispel political party stereotypes – and in the process, perhaps unintentionally, some stereotypes about Meghan as well.

Throughout this book, Michael and Meghan are no holds barred – taking hits at each other with the honesty of siblings. For example, Michael has no qualms poking fun at Meghan’s drink of choice.

‘Meghan only drinks it [Bud Light] because she has some family allegiance to the brand. She is the one who gets me into the stuff and I have to say, if you’re only going to drink one watery kind of shitty beer that will get you buzzed, Bud Light is definitely the way to go. I love it.’

And when the odd couple talks politics they do so with hilarious honesty. For instance, Black compares the political scene to mediocre pizza.

‘Any company that wants my patronage has to provide a better product than the other guy … I think of it like this: Pizza hut makes a better pizza than Domino’s, but they’re both pretty shitty pizzas. Well, what if Pizza Hut and Domino’s were the only two pizza places in the whole country? That would be awful, and that awfulness pretty much describes our political system right now.’

And while Michael’s character is more dark and doomsday oriented, Meghan’s constant stream of optimism is both adorably reassuring and, at times, utterly annoying – but always completely honest.

‘In reality, it is people like Glen [a friend they met in New Orleans] who should run for higher office: people who know the ins and outs of their city and the people who live in it and maintain a palpable sense of pride for it.’

I enjoyed this political tome. It was funny. It was honest. It was filled with interesting characters who weren’t afraid to say what they felt. This book didn’t feel like it had been edited down by a snooty PR executive looking to turn everything his clients say into vanilla mush, so that was definitely a plus. Another plus, the book was edited down to a palpable and enjoyable read rather than a long, never-ending politico rant. And while this book didn’t change my political mindset, it did offer me a different side to the great American political story and encouraged me to be a little more understanding to different ideals. Like RV driver and resident ‘gumdrop’ Cousin John says:

‘ You can’t stop a freight train, and my freight train is a freight train of love and understanding’

Salon Summary

RECOMMENDABILITY: 3 {out of 5} stars  |  ★★★☆☆
REPETITIVE READABILITY: 1 {out of 5} stars  |  ★☆☆☆☆
RATING: 4 {out of 5} stars  |  ★★★★☆